Aktualności: Kalendarz TPZN 2021 - http://forum.tpzn.pl/index.php/topic,15351.msg115701.html#msg115701

  • 01 Grudzień 2020, 19:19:54

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okejos

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« Odpowiedź #15 dnia: 11 Październik 2019, 21:59:41 »
 Un dépôt monétaire composé de 151 sesterces en alliage cuivreux a été découvert à Horbourg-Wihr, enfoui à proximité d’une habitation du 2e siècle dans ce qui pourrait être une cour ou un jardin.
🎧👥📋 La collaboration entre les archéologues et un prospecteur agréé spécialiste de la numismatique a permis de le fouiller avec minutie et d'entreprendre son étude détaillée. Si une soixantaine de dépôts de l’époque romaine est recensée à ce jour en Alsace, la plupart relève de découvertes fortuites dont les contextes ne sont pas toujours documentés.
Ici, l’étude stratigraphique a permis de détailler des phases de thésaurisation qui s’échelonnent sur près d’un siècle, entre 81 et 175. Sa valeur reste cependant assez faible ; elle équivaut au tiers du revenu annuel d’un ouvrier agricole. La disposition des monnaies en piles peut suggérer leur emballage en rouleaux dans du tissu ou du cuir, mais aucune trace d’enveloppe ne semble conservée.
Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur cum illis

okejos

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« Odpowiedź #16 dnia: 15 Październik 2019, 11:42:08 »
Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur cum illis

okejos

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« Odpowiedź #17 dnia: 16 Październik 2019, 06:51:49 »
The sceptre of the Emperor Maxentius, topped by a crystal sphere, was rediscovered during excavations at the foot of the Palatine Hill, close to the Arch of Constantine.

Discovered in 2006, it was found in a wooden box lined with silk in a sealed up alcove. 2 other boxes were found, containing other symbols of imperial power such as orbs and lances. It is believed that at the time of a Maxentius' defeat at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge by Constantine in 312 CE the imperial regalia was hidden and sealed off by Maxentius' supporters before Constantine entered the city.

The regalia are on display in the National Museum of Rome at Palazzo Massimo, near Termini station.
Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur cum illis

okejos

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« Odpowiedź #18 dnia: 16 Październik 2019, 06:53:56 »
FRESCO DISCOVERED IN POMPEI

Archaeologists have uncovered a well-preserved fresco of two fighting gladiators in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii.

It depicts two gladiators in action, one wielding a short sword, the other cowering as blood spurts from wounds all over his body.

The defeated soldier is lifting his finger to beg for mercy.

The fresco was found in what had been a basement that could have been used as a shop, and there may have been a tavern and brothel above.

The painting, which is 1.5 metres wide, suggests the place was frequented by gladiators.

It was found at Regio V, 54-acre site near an archaeological park not yet open to the public.

Dario Franceschini, Italy’s culture minister, said the discovery showed Pompeii was “an inexhaustible mine for research and knowledge for archaeologists”.
Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur cum illis

okejos

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Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur cum illis

okejos

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ram17

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  • Masz jakieś skojarzenia do mojego awatara?
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« Odpowiedź #21 dnia: 19 Październik 2019, 17:08:44 »
Ciekawe co to za prominent i czy uda im się to rozstrzygnąć
https://video.wp.pl/badaczom-opadly-szczeki-niesamowite-odkrycie-w-chorwacji-6436418992425089v

okejos

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Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur cum illis

okejos

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nosfer3

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cancan62

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"Moneta kolekcjonerska" to jak "świnka morska", ani świnka, ani morska.

Pozdrowienia.
Jacek

nosfer3

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« Odpowiedź #26 dnia: 23 Październik 2019, 21:15:43 »

okejos

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« Odpowiedź #27 dnia: 05 Listopad 2019, 07:31:45 »
akcja pandora w Polsce trwa
co ciekawe złodzieja jak ukradnie do 400 zł  wypuszczą bo to wykroczenie, a za boratynkę warta 3 zł  mozna dostac 2 lata :D
https://www.zwiadowcahistorii.pl/kolejny-watpliwy-sukces-policji-z-raciborza-znow-zatrzymali-poszukiwacza-w-polu/?fbclid=IwAR0SjcXEt2bksnwGzAi_BaQdKqIERF9C6TJ_5ru5nybvtPtZAEv3wuQM090
Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur cum illis

okejos

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« Odpowiedź #28 dnia: 07 Listopad 2019, 11:14:35 »
Continuing our theme this week on Doncaster I've been tasked with looking into the coinage we know was used during the settlement's long history. I'm focusing my attention, not on random detecting finds from the plough soil, but on purposely buried caches of coins ...... hoards !!!

What do coin hoards tell us about Roman Britain ?

Hoards of valued materials, particularly coins, are a common discovery across the former Roman Empire. In the past, coin hoards have been mainly studied by numismatists as artefacts largely divorced from their archaeological context, under the guise of monetary, economic and political history.
With the increased use of metal detectors, around eighty hoards are added to the Portable Antiques Scheme every year. The number of recorded Roman coin hoards currently stands at around 2,700.
Most Roman coin hoards have been interpreted as having been buried at times of economic or political upheaval, with the intention of later recovery. It has also been suggested that in some instances their owners did not try to recover Roman hoards, as the coins had become difficult to exchange following monetary reform. Some may have been buried as part of ritualised votive practices and were never mean to be reclaimed. In truth, it is very difficult to lay a blanket over every hoard and attach a ‘reason’ for its burial and non-retrieval. I was asked to help identify a recent coin hoard, of approximately one thousand silver coins from near Doncaster, which mostly date to the Severan Period of 193 – 210 AD. The oldest coin was a Republican denarius from approximately 80 BC but the last coin minted was struck in 235 AD

So, there are a few questions
Why were 1,000 coins deposited in a pot and buried in the ground not far from the fort on the River Don known as Danum ?
Why does the hoard of coins span 315 years ?
What proportion of someone’s wealth does this represent ?
What do the coins tell us about life in the third Century?

The answer to the first question of why the coins were buried will probably never be answered fully. In truth, there are countless reasons. The owner may have been going on a trip, buried the coins for safe keeping, and never returned. The old favourite of the owner burying the coins in a time of troubles and something terrible happened. The coins may have been placed in the domestic grain pit and the owner died of natural causes without telling anyone where the stash was.1,000 denari just so happens to be the payment made to a retiring army veteran in lieu of the regulation plot of land. Could this have been a Serviceman's pension ? Imagination is the only limitation when searching for reasons.

As mentioned, the coins date from 80 BC to 235 AD. From the days of the Republic to the end of the Severan dynasty and the death of the Emperor Severus Alexander. One very worn Republican coin ( 80 BC ), two worn blank discs, a worn coin of Vittelus ( 69 AD ), a worn coin of Otho ( 69 AD ) and one of Vespasian ( 71 AD ). The historical timeline is maintained by coins of Domitian, Trajan, the Adoptive Emperors, through Clodius Albinus, Pertinax and onto Septimius Severus and his sons Caracalla and Geta. The majority of the hoard are made up of these latter three and their wives. The timeline continues to its end with coins of Macrinus, Elagabalus and Severus Alexander. With the exception of the oldest coins the majority of the coins look as if they were struck yesterday so had clearly not been in circulation for very long, if at all…… A virtually unbroken historical record.

It is, of course, impossible to say what this heap of silver meant to the owner in terms of wealth. Was it all that person had. Was it a loose change pot ? A saving scheme ? Had the economy collapsed so badly after 235 AD that the owner buried his silver hoping that one day it would be of some value again ? Can we draw any clues from how we have handled silver coins in the recent past? When George V reduced the silver content in his coins in 1920, people held onto the old coins in the hope that bullion prices would increase and make them valuable again. Of course that never happened but coins were kept in jars and drawers for years.

What does the hoard tell us about life in the third Century? A lot of information can be gleaned from the many hundreds of reverse designs showing deities, the Emperor being an Emperor, Victories against Rome’s enemies, accolades to the Army and prayers to the Gods. The hoard also tells us about the economy. As the coins become more recent they are thinner than earlier coins and contain less precious silver. No doubt their buying power in the market place reflected the debased coinage. In 235 AD the Empire went into meltdown, fell off a cliff due to political instability. In the eighty years from the death of Severus Alexander to the succession of Constantius I, who became Emperor in 305 AD, there were no fewer than 44 men who wore the purple. The Empire was rent from East to West by Usurpers and civil wars.
Like so many others, this hoard is an enigma. Thankfully, the finder did the right thing in reporting his good fortune and one day we may all benefit from seeing it displayed in all it’s glory.
Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur cum illis

okejos

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